Bulova explains the Fairfax County transfer to the schools

On Tuesday I reported that Fairfax County Public Schools will probably receive a larger transfer. Fairfax County Board of Supervisors Chairman Sharon Bulova describes this decision in her monthly newsletter:

The first major item on our agenda was a public hearing, and then adoption of the County’s Carryover Review for the 2014 Fiscal Year Budget, which ended in June of this year.

 

The County ended the 2014 Fiscal Year with a relatively modest $11 million positive balance out of a $3.7 billion General Fund Budget. This balance is the result of about $8.3 million in more revenue than projected – less than 1% (0.23%) of the original projection. The rest of the balance was mostly the result of savings and efficiencies within County operations.


You can view details of our Board’s Budget Committee meeting of September 2nd and action on the Carryover Budget by going to the County’s website at fairfaxcounty.gov/dmb. This site also includes an excellent video that explains the budget process.

 

On Tuesday, I moved adoption of the Carryover Budget package and the Board supported holding the balance in reserve in order to assist us with adoption of the upcoming Fiscal Year 2016 Budget. We are still not out of the woods as both the County and State are affected by Sequestration and Federal cutbacks in contracting which has impacted our commercial sector.

 

The Fairfax County Public Schools have also ended the year with a positive ending balance of $23 million. This is after absorbing the cost of beginning all-day-Mondays at elementary schools this school year. Our Board has been supportive of this School Board initiative. On Tuesday, the Board agreed to “bump up” the 3% projected increase in the School Transfer that we have given School staff as guidance for development of next year’s budget. The “bump up” will reflect actual costs for implementing this change and is meant to accommodate the recurring cost of full day Mondays next fiscal year.

 

 

Fairfax County Public Schools will probably receive a larger transfer

The Fairfax County Board of Supervisors voted 8-2 today to give “guidance” to the school board in budgeting for next year to expect a possible, but not guaranteed, increase of the transfer by 3 percent plus the amount of the cost of full-day Mondays in 2015-16.

At the public hearing preceding the vote, I urged the board to give the school system additional money for the FY 2015 Revised Budget. This was a request the school board had made earlier, but at a joint County-School Board budget meeting September 2, Chairman Sharon Bulova instead proposed adjusting the FY 2016 budget guidance to include providing FCPS with ongoing funding for the actual cost of full-day Mondays in addition to the transfer increase. School Board Chairman Tamara Derenak Kaufax sent Bulova a September 5 memo thanking her for that proposal and did not ask for additional funds for FY 2015.

However, even this compromise was not acceptable to Michael R. Frey (R-Sully) or Linda Q. Smyth (D-Providence). At today’s meeting, Frey said it was wrong on so many levels. He questioned how full-day Mondays could be such a high priority when it wasn’t even included in the budget that the school board approved in May. He said, “We are destroying our own credibility.”

I started out my testimony by saying “Yesterday was the first Monday in over 40 years that all students in our elementary schools were able to have a full day in school.”

Frey asked why it was such an urgent matter to change a policy that had been in effect for 40 years. Derenauk Kaufax had explained this very well in her earlier memo: “The timing of the decision after the FY 2015 budget was approved was not our normal process, but FCPS was not in compliance with state requirements to provide a minimum of 990-hours of instruction with an early release on Mondays.”

The state requirements had changed in 2006 and at the time I pointed this out as an urgent reason to eliminate the Monday early dismissal policy. This February I helped start a petition urging the school board to end this policy. We said, “Fairfax County should expand the elementary school schedule to make it easier for schools to comply with the state requirements for the standard school day while at the same time officially ending the unrealistic 10-minute limit for recess.“

Frey also questioned why a few extra snow days would make a schedule change such a priority.  I think it just dilutes the severity of the time deficit to cite the snow day issue as a justification for reform. That was only a very small part of the problem. It’s not about the snow days; it’s about the standard school days.

Here are the comments I made at the public hearing:

Yesterday was the first Monday in over 40 years that all students in our elementary schools were able to have a full day in school. Last February I helped start a petition urging the Fairfax County School Board to end the policy of dismissing elementary school students 2 ½ hours early every Monday. We said, “Fairfax County should expand the elementary school schedule to make it easier for schools to comply with the state requirements for the standard school day while at the same time officially ending the unrealistic 10-minute limit for recess.“

On June 26, the school board voted to implement a uniform elementary day that will increase instructional time and will allow for 20 minutes of daily recess for children. The cost of $7.6 million for all 142 elementary schools represents a needed investment for a very substantial improvement in the schedules for both students and teachers.

The school board deserves applause for making this decision, not a slap on the wrist. I urge you to demonstrate your full support of this vitally needed reform by giving the school system additional money for the FY 2015 Revised Budget.

Here is a link to the FY 2014 Carryover Board Motions that were approved today. The paragraph discussing the transfer says:

“Board approval of an increase in they FY 2016 planned transfer for school operations, which is currently projected at 3%, to also cover the FY 2016 costs of full day Mondays. The School have funded, within their Carryover Review, the preliminary estimate of Full Day Mondays for FY 2015. Once the actual costs of implementation have been identified, the FY 2016 budget forecast will reflect these recurring costs.”

The carryover also adjusted the County budget for school clinics, School-Age Child Care (SACC), and the Monday programming at RECenters and Nature Centers operated by the Fairfax County Park Authority.

Whatever misgivings Frey and Smythe may have had about the timing of the implementation of full-day Mondays this September, I don’t understand why they were not willing to agree to the possibility of new funding for FY 2016. It’s a positive development that a majority of the supervisors voted for this.

The memo by Derenak Koufax ends with thanks to Bulova and the other supervisors who supported additional funding:

On behalf of the School Board and the Fairfax County Public Schools administration, I want to thank you for proposing a motion to adjust the FY 2016 budget guidance to include providing FCPS with ongoing funding for the actual cost of full-day Mondays in addition to the transfer increase. I would also like to express our gratitude to the Supervisors who publicly offered their support for this recommendation. We recognize and thank the Supervisors fur funding the costs that will occur in the County’s budget due to full-day Mondays this school year.

The School Board and the FCPS community appreciate that a strong investment in education remains your top priority. Thank you again for the collaborative dialogue and the opportunity to share the benefits of implementing a full-day of instruction on Mondays.”

Correction–A typo in the number of hours was corrected June 10. (990 hours, not 99 hours)

Students will be in school all day today in Fairfax elementary schools

For the first time in over 40 years, all Fairfax County elementary schools will be in session for a full day today. Students will not be dismissed 2.5 hours early, as had been the practice in past years.

The Fairfax County School Board made this very wise change by a vote of 10-1 on June 26, 2014. This was a good example of teamwork by Superintendent Karen Garza, staff members, and school board members. Working together they made a very positive change for the students as well as the teachers.

I hope the Board of Supervisors joins in this teamwork by providing extra funding. The school board deserves support for working efficiently to implement needed change without delaying reform for another year.

I criticize the critics of additional funding for the schools

It would have been absurd for the school board to reject a much needed improvement solely on the grounds that it would have been more pleasing to the bureaucratic workings of the Fairfax County budgeting process to have approved the proposal in January.”

This is a quote from the additional comments I have posted on why the Board of Supervisors should provide more funds to the school system.

So far there are nine comments on the Washington Post article Fairfax full-day Mondays meeting ends with tense exchange on funding.

Someone who often posts under the name “1bnthrdntht” noted that the other days were lengthened decades ago when Monday was shortened, stated “FCPS has always provided the required number of hours for classes,” then asked me, “So how is this Monday change the ‘right thing’?”

My response:

Yes the other days were lengthened over 40 years ago. Meanwhile other school districts have also lengthened their days, all of them. FCPS has not been consistently providing the required numbers of hours for classes for the past 7 years. In response to my complaints about the lack of sufficient time for recess, FCPS lengthened the hours of some schools slightly, of others quite a bit, to allow just enough time in the week for 10 minutes per day for recess. At that time there were 16 schools with full day Mondays who did not need to have a very short recess. However, all schools reverted back to early dismissals in the past few years, so all of the elementary schools had enough time in the day to provide only 10 minutes for recess. I know that many, and perhaps all the schools actually provided more time for recess, so they were not meeting the requirements in the Standards of Accreditation. In your experience, were recess periods limited to 10 minutes per day? Do you think this is an adequate amount of time for recess?

So far I have received no reply to these questions.

Another commenter, “cosmic9393,” accused the school board of lying about the budget, saying, “For once, Frey is absolutely right.”

I replied:

Last January the FCPS administration did NOT have a plan for full-day Mondays. However, let’s give Superintendent Karen Garza credit for tasking the new Interim Deputy Superintendent, Dan Parris, with the difficult task of leading a working group to come up with a plan for providing an affordable way of providing full-day Mondays for the students AND alternative planning time for the teachers. This working group was still in the midst of its deliberations when I met with Mr. Parris in March. Even though he was optimistic that they could come up with a good plan, there was certainly not sufficient grounds for amending the budget request to the Board of Supervisors in April. For years and years the prospect of changing the elementary schedule has been such a controversial issue that it was hardly even talked about. The Board of Supervisors would have paid no attention whatsoever to a request for an additional amount of money on the chance that a plan would be developed and approved by the school board sometime in the following weeks.
So, Frey is absolutely wrong. The school board was not hiding any cards under the table when it made its request in April. When they were given some good cards in May, in the form of a golden opportunity to improve the disgraceful and inadequate elementary school schedule, they rightly decided to play the good hand that was dealt them.
It would have been absurd for the school board to reject a much needed improvement solely on the grounds that it would have been more pleasing to the bureaucratic workings of the Fairfax County budgeting process to have approved the proposal in January.
It would have been criminal to continue with the status quo for another whole year, all the while failing to be in compliance with state standards for the school day.
It is time for the Board of Supervisors to give a resounding vote of support to the Fairfax County School Board for finally doing the right thing. Give more money for the students.

Free Bob McDonnell

I was very disappointed to hear the news that Governor Bob McDonnell and his wife will probably spend decades, or at least years, behind bars. This is an incredible waste. A fair sentence would involve fines and community service.

The money spent incarcerating them and many other nonviolent offenders would be better spent on teachers and education. I’m not sure why we have such a mania for building more and more prisons.

Board of Supervisors should provide more funds

Fairfax full-day Mondays meeting ends with tense exchange on funding – The Washington Post. I posted these comments:

Superintendent Karen Garza and the Fairfax County School Board did the right thing by implementing full-day Mondays. The Board of Supervisors should support their decision to do the right thing for the students. When you have a choice between right and wrong, you choose what is right. It is as simple as that. I helped start a petition in February asking the school board to implement full-day Mondays and provide a longer time for recess. The petition stated:

“The Virginia Standards of Accreditation state that the standard school day for students in grades 1 through 12 shall average at least 5 ½ hours, excluding breaks for meals and recess. With a half hour dedicated to lunch, FCPS elementary schools theoretically have only 10 minutes per day available for recess. Thankfully, the 10-minute recess is rarely enforced. However, this leaves students with less than the mandated amount of instructional time.”

Supervisor Michael R. Frey (R-Sully) said he was displeased with the way the school system implemented the change after budget negotiations were over. Would he have preferred for the school system to continue shortchanging the students?

As our Full Schooldays petition stated, “Fairfax County should expand the elementary school schedule to make it easier for schools to comply with the state requirements for the standard school day while at the same time officially ending the unrealistic 10-minute limit for recess. The Fairfax County School Board should end the policy of dismissing elementary school students 2 ½ or 2 hours early every Monday.”

This was a very serious problem that needed to be fixed. Now it is fixed. The Board of Supervisors (BOS) should provide some money to show their support for the only lawful and logical course of action that was available to the School Board.
The BOS will hold a public hearing on the supplemental appropriation of funds next Tuesday. They should wait to hear the speakers before deciding on their vote on the funding.

Prince George’s secondary school eliminates recess

A Prince George’s County charter school currently serving grades 6-8 is shortening the school day by eliminating the daily 25-minute recess period. College Park Academy opened in 2013 with grades 6-7. The charter school is adding a grade every year until it reaches 12th grade and 700 students.

The charter agreement calls for a 7.5 hour-long day, from 8:25 a.m. to 3:55 p.m. Last night the Prince George’s County Board of Education approved the school’s request to move the dismissal time to 3:20 p.m. and cancel recess. This waiver request was granted on an emergency basis so that the change can go into effect immediately.

“Students at College Park Academy have had recess since the school opened a year ago,” the Washington Post reports. “According to county school regulations, middle schools are not required to offer recess, and a schools spokesman said that the county’s middle schools don’t have it. County elementary schools ‘should’ offer recess for ‘no less than 15 minutes per day and for no more than 30 minutes per day,’ according to regulations in Prince George’s.”

Later high school start times and The Onion

Some of the reactions “quoted” by The Onion regarding later high school start times ring pretty true to other comments I have heard recently. “No way. It’s crucial to give teenagers the skills they need to slog through life half-asleep.”

 

 

More on salt and health

If you are looking for a good summary about the recent scientific studies on salt and health, the New York Times editorial board says, “There is considerable evidence that lowering sodium can reduce blood pressure, but there is scant evidence that reducing blood pressure from levels that are not clearly high will necessarily reduce the risk of heart attacks, strokes and death.”

Previous studies have found little evidence to support those low recommended sodium targets. Now a large study by researchers at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, which tracked more than 100,000 people from 17 countries on five continents, has found that the safest levels of sodium consumption are between 3,000 and 6,000 milligrams. Consumption below that level (but higher than our current targets) showed increased risk of death and cardiovascular events. Roughly 10 percent of the patients followed in the study fell below 3,000 milligrams, a sizable number to put at risk. Other studies have found that very low levels of sodium can disrupt biochemical systems that are essential to human health or trigger hormones that raise cardiovascular risk

Clearly the U.S. Department of Agriculture should reconsider how far to reduce salt content in school meals.

Is too much transparency preventing problem-solving actions?

Transparency in government might be overrated. That’s the interesting argument David Frum makes. He says that in the name of reform, Americans over the past half century have weakened political authority. “Instead of yielding more accountability, however, these reforms have yielded more lobbying, more expense, more delay, and more indecision.”

Here’s a real-world example from the executive branch. Throughout most of American history, presidents and their staffs have been able to hold confidential meetings in the White House complex. The independent counsels who investigated the Clinton White House jolted this traditional understanding by demanding—and getting—access to White House visitor logs.

Frum explains that the George W. Bush administration attempted to restore the traditional confidentiality of White House visitor lists, then people sued to gain access to the logs.

Reformers keep trying to eliminate backroom wheeling and dealing from American governance. What they end up doing instead is eliminating governance itself, not just in the White House but in Congress, too.

This may be true even at the level of school boards. I think it is wonderful that the Fairfax County School Board voted 10-1 to eliminate the weekly Monday early dismissal policy in the elementary schools. I will be writing more about this vote and the debate in the future, since it was very significant.

However, it was so clearly the right decision–and the only logical decision–that the most interesting question might be–what took so long? Could it be that the Fairfax County School Board could use more flexible working arrangements?

Is state law too strict on open meetings? Could backroom wheeling and dealing have gotten this situation fixed years ago?

Clearly most parents did not support the Monday early dismissal policy. Those who complain the decision was made too quickly justify their opposition in the name of “process.”

Perhaps the school board should do a little soul searching about how such a terribly unpopular policy was allowed to drag on year after year. Whatever “process” was in place that served to prop up such a dysfunctional schedule needs to be reevaluated.